Theme: Frontiers in plant genomics : From discovery to applications

Plant Genomics 2016
Past Report of Genomics 2015

Renowned Speakers

Plant Genomics 2016

Track 1: Transgenic Plants

Over the last 30 years, the field of genetic engineering has developed rapidly due to the greater understanding of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as the chemical double helix code from which genes are made. The term genetic engineering is used to describe the process by which the genetic makeup of an organism can be altered using “recombinant DNA technology.” This involves the use of laboratory tools to insert, alter, or cut out pieces of DNA that contain one or more genes of interest. Genetic engineering techniques are used only when all other techniques have been exhausted, i.e. when the trait to be introduced is not present in the germplasm of the crop and some of societies associated with transgenic plants includes American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB),Australian Society of Plant Scientists (ASPS), Argentinean Society of Plant Physiology (SAFV), American Society of Agronomy (ASA ), African Crop Science Society (ACSS), Brazilian Society of Plant Physiology (SBFV)

Related Conferences: International Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA;  Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ; Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany; Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA;  Protein Synthesis and Translational Control September 9 – 13, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany;  Workshop on Plant Development and Drought Stress Pacific Grove November 1 - 4, 2015 CA, USA; Plant-Based Vaccines, Antibodies and Biologics June 8-10, 2015 Lausanne, Switzerland; ICBAGE 2015 :  Conference on Biodiversity and Agricultural Genetic Engineering March 9 - 10, 2015 Miami, USA;  Conference on Chromosomal Genetics and Evolution September 25 - 26, 2015 London, United Kingdom. 2nd Global Summit on Plant Science, October 06-08, 2016 Crowne Plaza, Heathrow, London, UK; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ; 6th International Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  International Conference on Green Energy  November 28-30, 2016 Atlanta, USA; Plant Biology 2016 July 9-13 Austin, Texas; 5th Pan American Plants and Bio Energy Meeting August 4-7, 2016, Sante Fe, New Mexico; Plant Genomics Congress September 12-13, 2016 Philadelphia, USA;  Plant Biology Europe: EPSO/FESPB 2016 Congress June 26-30, 2016 Prague, Czech Republic; WISP Course on wheat genetics November 21-23. 2016 John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK; International Society for Plant Pathology;

Track 2: Plant Breeding

Plant breeding is the science of maximizing positive genetic traits in plants that people grow. It consists of analytical frameworks that allow researchers to create and select plants that are consistently outstanding in desired traits. The central objective in plant breeding is to improve the genetic basis of commercial crop species to comply with changing demands on yield and quality. Statistics plays a key role in modern plant breeding. A classical quantitative genetic model writes the phenotype as an outcome of genetic, environmental and genotype by environment interaction effects. In the genomic era, this classical model has been extended and generalized. Linear mixed models played an important role in classical quantitative genetics and still do so inmodern genetics.  The availability of genomic tools and resources is leading to a new revolution of plant breeding, as they facilitate the study of the genotype and its relationship with the phenotype, in particular for complex traits and few societies associated with Plant breeding includes Botanical Society of China (BSC),Canadian Society of Plant Biologists (CSPB), Chile’s National Network of Plant Biologists (CNNPB), Chinese Society of Plant Biology (CSPB), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Crop Science Society of China(CSSC), European Association for Research on Plant Breeding (EUCARPIA)

Related Conferences: Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA;  Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany; Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL,USA;  Plant Breeding Congress and EUCARPIA-Oil and Protein Crops Section Conference November 01-05 Antalya ,Turkey;  Conference on Rye Breeding and Genetics June 24 – 26, 2015 Wrocław, Poland;  Congress of Plant Molecular Biology(IPMB) October 25 - 30, 2015 Foz do Iguazu, Brazil; Plant Genomics Congress September 14-15, 2015 St. Louis, USA; XVIth Meeting of the EUCARPIA Section Biometrics in Plant Breeding September  9-11, 2015 Wageningen, the Netherlands

Track 3: Plant Epigenetics

A number of epigenetic phenomena were discovered in plants, but are not limited to plants. For instance, paramutation describes the heritable change in expression status of an allele upon its exposure to an allele that has the same sequence but displays a different expression status.  Plant biology has made to the discovery and study of epigenetic phenomena, plants provide ideal systems for epigenomics research. Epigenomic modifications alter gene expression without changing the letters of the DNA alphabet (A-T-C-G), providing cells with an additional tool to fine-tune how genes control the cellular machinery. By understanding epigenomic alterations in plants, scientists may be able to manipulate them for various purposes, including biofuels and creating crops that can withstand stressful events such as drought some of societies associated with Plant Epigenetics includes American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB), Australian Society of Plant Scientists (ASPS),Argentinean Society of Plant Physiology (SAFV), American Society of Agronomy (ASA), African Crop Science Society (ACSS), Brazilian Society of Plant Physiology (SBFV), Botanical Society of China (BSC), Canadian Society of Plant Biologists (CSPB), Chile’s National Network of Plant Biologists (CNNPB), Chinese Society of Plant Biology (CSPB), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Crop Science Society of China (CSSC),European Association for Research on Plant Breeding (EUCARPIA)

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology  June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science  September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA;  Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA; Conference on Chromosomal Genetics and Evolution September 25 - 26, 2015 London, United Kingdom; EMBL Symposium — The mobile genome: Genetic and physiological impacts of transposable elements September 16-19, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany; The Epigenetics Discovery Congress London September  24–25, 2015 London, United Kingdom; Plant Epigenetics: From Genotype to Phenotype February,  15–19 2016 Taos, United States;  EMBO/EMBL Symposium: Chromatin and Epigenetics May  6 – 10, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany; 

Track4: Genome Sequencing 

 Plant Genomics researchers have readily embraced new algorithms, technologies and approaches to generate genome, transcriptome and epigenome datasets for model and crop species that have permitted deep inferences into plant biology. When a species’ reference genome is available, whole-genome resequencing is an efficient approach for discovering genes, SNPs, and structural variants, while simultaneously determininggenotypes. Information from these studies will fill in the gaps that exist in the genetic maps of many plant species, improving plant breeding and selection, and enabling definitive comparative genomic analyses within and across species and few associations includes The Australian biotechnology associationEuropean federation of biotechnology ,European molecular biology laboratoryThe human genome variation society, Human Proteome OrganisationThe  centre for genetic engineering and biotechnologyProtein research foundationWorld health organization

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology  June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science  September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA;  Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany; Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA; Conference on Chromosomal Genetics and Evolution September 25 - 26, 2015 London, United Kingdom;  EMBL Symposium — The mobile genome: Genetic and physiological impacts of transposable elements September 16-19, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany; The Epigenetics Discovery Congress  London September  24–25, 2015 London, United Kingdom; Plant Epigenetics: From Genotype to Phenotype February,  15–19 2016 Taos, United States;  EMBO/EMBL Symposium: Chromatin and Epigenetics May  6 – 10, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany; 

Track5: Plant Genomics Applications

Recent technological advancements have substantially expanded our ability to analyze and understand plant genomes and to reduce the gap existing between genotype and phenotype. The fast evolving field of genomicsallows scientists to analyze thousands of genes in parallel, to understand the genetic architecture of plant genomes and also to isolate the genes responsible for mutations. Model organisms provide genetic and molecular insights into the biology of more complex species. Since the genomes of most plant species are either too large or too complex to be fully analyzed, the plant scientific community has adopted model organisms. They share features such as being diploid and appropriate for genetic analysis, being amenable to genetic transformation, having a (relatively) small genome and a short growth cycle, having commonly available tools and resources, and being the focus of research by a large scientific community. Genomics will accelerate the application of gene technology to agriculture. Plant genomics research now accounts for only 2% of the U.S. federal research and development budget, despite a 35% rate of return to society. some of societies associated with Plant Genomics Applications includes American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB), Australian Society of Plant Scientists (ASPS), Argentinean Society of Plant Physiology (SAFV), American Society of Agronomy (ASA),African Crop Science Society (ACSS), Brazilian Society of Plant Physiology (SBFV)

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA;  Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany; Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA;  Plant Genomes and Biotechnology: from genes to networks Dec ember 02-05, 2015 Berlin, Germany; Plant Genome Evolution 2015 September,  6 - 8 2015 Amsterdam, The Netherlands;  GET Global Conference September 17-19, 2015 Vienna,  Austria; Immunogenomics 2015September 28-30, 2015, Huntsville, Alabama; The   Conference on Genomics Shenzhen October 22-25, 2015 Shenzhen,  China; Plant Genomics Congress September 14-15, 2015 St. Louis, MO, USA;

Track6: Plant Tissue Culture

Plant cells can be grown in isolation from intact plants in tissue culture systems. The cells have the characteristics of callus cells, rather than other plant cell types. These are the cells that appear on cut surfaces when a plant is wounded and which gradually cover and seal the damaged area. The plant cells can grow on a solid surface as friable, pale-brown lumps (called callus), or as individual or small clusters of cells in a liquid medium called a suspension culture. These cells can be maintained indefinitely provided they are sub-cultured regularly into fresh growth medium.

Tissue culture cells generally lack the distinctive features of most plant cells. They have a small vacuole, lack chloroplasts and photosynthetic pathways and the structural or chemical features that distinguish so many cell types within the intact plant are absent. They are most similar to the undifferentiated cells found in meristematic regions which become fated to develop into each cell type as the plant grows. Tissue cultured cells can also be induced to re-differentiate into whole plants by alterations to the growth media. Plant tissue cultures can be initiated from almost any part of a plant. The physiological state of the plant does have an influence on its response to attempts to initiate tissue culture. The parent plant must be healthy and free from obvious signs of disease or decay. The source, termed explant, may be dictated by the reason for carrying out the tissue culture. Younger tissue contains a higher proportion of actively dividing cells and is more responsive to a callus initiation programme. The plants themselves must be actively growing, and not about to enter a period of dormancy. some of societies associated with Plant Tissue Culture  includes American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB),Australian Society of Plant Scientists (ASPS), Argentinean Society of Plant Physiology (SAFV), American Society of Agronomy (ASA), African Crop Science Society (ACSS), Brazilian Society of Plant Physiology (SBFV)

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA;  Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany; Conference on Green Energy and Expo September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA;  Plant Genomes and Biotechnology: from genes to networks Dec ember 02-05, 2015 Berlin, Germany; Plant Genome Evolution 2015 September,  6 - 8 2015 Amsterdam, The Netherlands;  GET Global Conference September 17-19, 2015 Vienna,  Austria; Immunogenomics 2015 September 28-30, 2015, Huntsville, Alabama; The   Conference on Genomics Shenzhen October 22-25, 2015 Shenzhen,  China; Plant Genomics Congress September 14-15, 2015 St. Louis, MO, USA;

Track7: Mendilian Genetics

In the 1860’s, an Austrian monk named Gregor Mendel introduced a new theory of inheritance based on his experimental work with pea plants.  Prior to Mendel, most people believed inheritance was due to a blending of parental ‘essences’, much like how mixing blue and yellow paint will produce a green colour.  Mendel instead believed that heredity is the result of discrete units of inheritance, and every single unit (or gene) was independent in its actions in an individual’s genome.  According to this Mendelian genetics concept, inheritance of a trait depends on the passing- one of these units.

Mendelian Genetics is widely regarded as the corner stone of classical genetics. It is a set of primary beliefs relating to the transmission of hereditary characteristic from parent organisms to their offspring; it underlies much of genetics. Off spring is the product of You do not have access to view this node, a new organism produced by one or more parents.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA;  Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany; Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA;  Plant Genomes and Biotechnology: from genes to networks Dec ember 02-05, 2015 Berlin, Germany; Plant Genome Evolution 2015 September,  6 - 8 2015 Amsterdam, The Netherlands;  GET Global Conference September 17-19, 2015 Vienna,  Austria; Immunogenomics 2015 September 28-30, 2015, Huntsville, Alabama; The   Conference on Genomics Shenzhen October 22-25, 2015 Shenzhen,  China; Plant Genomics Congress September 14-15, 2015 St. Louis, MO, USA;

Track8: Plant Genomics in World Economy

The global market for genomics is expected to reach USD 22.1 billion by 2020, growing at an estimated CAGR of 10.3% from 2014 to 2020, according to a new study by Grand View Research, Inc. Genomics play an imperative role in the field of infectious disease testing by enabling the use of fast and effective result rendering molecular diagnostic tests. This, coupled with growing prevalence of infectious diseases and hospital acquired infections is expected to drive market growth during the forecast period. Other driving factors for this market include decreasing prices of DNA sequencing, increasing demand for genome analysis in animal and plant feedstock, extensive presence of both private and public external funding programs and growing patient awareness levels. In addition, presence of untapped growth opportunities in emerging countries such as India, Brazil and China and the increasing health awareness are expected to serve this market as future growth opportunities.

Genomics based diagnostics dominated the overall market in terms of revenue at 36.4% in 2013 majorly owing to the presence of a relatively larger number of RandD programs. Genomics based personalized medicine segment on the other hand is expected to grow at the fastest CAGR of over 12.0% from 2014 to 2020 due to increasing demand for population based therapeutic solutions and subsequent increase in RandD initiatives.

Plant Genomics Market Size - $11.1 Billion in 2013, Market Growth - CAGR of 10.3% from 2014 to 2020, Market Trends - Growing demand for personalized medicine and the consequent rise in demand for genomics based RandD initiatives is expected to drive market growth during the forecast period

Related Conferences: International Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ; International Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  International Conference on Green Energy and Expo September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA;  Protein Synthesis and Translational Control September 9 – 13, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany; Workshop on Plant Development and Drought Stress Pacific Grove November 1 - 4, 2015 CA, USA; Plant-Based Vaccines, Antibodies and Biologics June 8-10, 2015 Lausanne, Switzerland; ICBAGE 2015 : International Conference on Biodiversity and Agricultural Genetic Engineering March 9 - 10, 2015 Miami, USA; International Conference on Chromosomal Genetics and Evolution September 25 - 26, 2015 London, United Kingdom;

Track9: Plant Stem Cells

Plants have emerged as powerful production platforms for the expression of fully functional recombinant mammalian proteins. These expression systems have demonstrated the ability to produce complex glycoproteins in a cost-efficient manner at large scale. The full realization of the therapeutic potential of stem cells has only recently come into the forefront of regenerative medicine. Stem cells are programmed cells that can differentiate into cells with specific functions. Regenerative therapies are used to stimulate healing and might be used in the future to treat various kinds of diseases. Regenerative medicine will result in an extended healthy life span. A fresh apple is a symbol for beautiful skin. Hair greying for example could be shown to result from the fact that the melanocyte stem cells in the hair follicle have died off.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA;  Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ; Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA;  Protein Synthesis and Translational Control September 9 – 13, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany;  Workshop on Plant Development and Drought Stress Pacific Grove November 1 - 4, 2015 CA, USA; Plant-Based Vaccines, Antibodies and Biologics June 8-10, 2015 Lausanne, Switzerland; ICBAGE 2015 :  International Conference on Biodiversity and Agricultural Genetic Engineering  March 9 - 10, 2015 Miami, USA;  Conference on Chromosomal Genetics and Evolution September 25 - 26, 2015 London, United Kingdom;

Track 10: Molecular Farming

The commonly used term ‘molecular farming’ describes the large‐scale production of valuable proteins intransgenic plants, including antibodies, vaccines, other pharmaceuticals and industrial proteins. Compared to traditionally used systems such as microbial cultures, plants offer many advantages with respect to economy, quality and safety. The organism or material into which the new genetic information is inserted is often referred to as the expression system since it serves as the system for “expressing” the new product.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA;  Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;   Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA;  Protein Synthesis and Translational Control September 9 – 13, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany;  Workshop on Plant Development and Drought Stress Pacific Grove November 1 - 4, 2015 CA, USA; Plant-Based Vaccines, Antibodies and Biologics June 8-10, 2015 Lausanne, Switzerland; ICBAGE 2015 :  International Conference on Biodiversity and Agricultural Genetic Engineering  March 9 - 10, 2015 Miami, USA;  Conference on Chromosomal Genetics and Evolution September 25 - 26, 2015 London, United Kingdom;

Track 11: Plant Physiology 

Plant Physiology and Biochemistry embraces physiology, biochemistry, molecular biologybiophysics, structure and genetics at different levels, from the molecular to the whole plant and environment. Plant physiology is a sub discipline of botany concerned with the functioning, or physiology, of plants. The field of plant physiology includes the study of all the internal activities of plants—those chemical and physical processes associated with life as they occur in plants. This includes study at many levels of scale of size and time. At the smallest scale are molecular interactions of photosynthesis and internal diffusion of water, minerals, and nutrients.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA;  Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;   Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA; Plant Physiology Congress December 11-14, 2015 New Delhi, India; Inorganic Polyphosphate (polyP) Physiology September 7, 2015 Charles Darwin House, London, United Kingdom; Signalling in Plant Development  September 20 – 24, 2015 Brno, Czech Republic

Track 12: Plant Pathology

Plant pathology is the scientific study of diseases in plants caused by pathogens (infectious organisms) and environmental conditions (physiological factors). Plant pathology also involves the study of pathogenidentification, disease etiology, disease cycles, economic impact, plant disease epidemiology, plant disease resistance, how plant diseases affect humans and animals, pathosystem genetics, and management of plant diseases. Plant pathology is an applied science that deals with the nature, causes and control of plant diseases in agriculture and forestry.

Related Conferences:  2nd Global Summit on Plant Science, October 06-08, 2016 Crowne Plaza, Heathrow, London, UK; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ; 6th International Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany; Plant Biology 2016 July 9-13 Austin, Texas; 5th Pan American Plants and Bio Energy Meeting August 4-7, 2016, Sante Fe, New Mexico; Plant Genomics Congress September 12-13, 2016 Philadelphia, USA;  Plant Biology Europe: EPSO/FESPB 2016 Congress June 26-30, 2016 Prague, Czech Republic; WISP Course on wheat genetics November 21-23. 2016 John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK;

Track 13: Systems Biology

Although ecologists and physiologists have been using a systems approach to study plants for many years, a systems biology approach that reaches to and includes molecular details is only feasible now with the advent of genomic technologies. Thus, the exciting prospect of the post-genomic era is for the first time to be able to integrate knowledge across different levels of biological organization and to anchor this at the molecular level. The biological systems studied in the department, such as cell cycle, lateral root development, cell death, lignification, bud dormancy, leaf development, plant-microbe interactions, are all highly complex and will benefit considerably from the integration in a systems biology approach. Biologists now have the tools at hand to view the global behaviour of their preferred model systems and to better select the genes that are likely to play key roles in the regulation of entire processes.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ; International Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA:  Signalling in Plant Development Brno September 20 – 24, 2015, Czech Republic; Systems Biology of Infection Symposium  September  6–10,  2015  Ascona, Switzerland; EMBL Symposium — Biological oscillators: Design, mechanism, function  November 12–14, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany;  Conference on Computational Systems-Biology and Bioinformatics November 22-25, 2015 BANGKOK, Thailand; Winter School on Quantitative Systems Biology December 7-22, 2015 Bangalore, India

Track 14:  Cereals and Crops        

Comparison of the order of blocks within the different cereal chromosomes revealed that each cereal genome can be derived from the cleavage of a single structure, a hypothetical ‘ancestral’ genome, from which the genomes of present day cereals and grasses have evolved. The rice genome is one of the smallest among the cereals and grasses, and in 1995, we demonstrated that rice could be a model for cereals based on this ‘synteny’ because its genome can be divided into groups of genes - a series of genomic building blocks - from which the other larger cereal genomes can be constructed. The genome analysis will also help in our efforts for improvement of staple foods for yield and quality, which is a continuous process because neither the conditions of cultivation nor the genomes have to be targeted to the need of adaptations to a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses. Functional food components vary across the cereal crops and within different tissues of grain.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  International Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics  September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA:  Cereals North America 2015 November  2-4, 2015 Winnipeg, Canada; PEI Soil and  Crop Conference February 25-26, 2015 PEI, HGCA; Smart Agriculture September 8, 2015, Birmingham, United kingdom;  Cereal and Bread Congress (ICBC) April  17 – 21, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey;  Australiasian Grain Science Conference September 16-18, 2015 Sydney, Australia

Track 1: Transgenic Plants

Over the last 30 years, the field of genetic engineering has developed rapidly due to the greater understanding of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as the chemical double helix code from which genes are made. The term genetic engineering is used to describe the process by which the genetic makeup of an organism can be altered using “recombinant DNA technology.” This involves the use of laboratory tools to insert, alter, or cut out pieces of DNA that contain one or more genes of interest. Genetic engineering techniques are used only when all other techniques have been exhausted, i.e. when the trait to be introduced is not present in the germplasm of the crop;

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;   International Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics    September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA: Protein Synthesis and Translational Control September 9 – 13, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany;  Workshop on Plant Development and Drought Stress Pacific Grove November 1 - 4, 2015 CA, USA; Plant-Based Vaccines, Antibodies and Biologics June 8-10, 2015 Lausanne, Switzerland; ICBAGE 2015 :  Conference on Biodiversity and Agricultural Genetic Engineering March 9 - 10, 2015 Miami, USA;  Conference on Chromosomal Genetics and Evolution September 25 - 26, 2015 London, United Kingdom

Track 2: Plant Breeding

Plant breeding is the science of maximizing positive genetic traits in plants that people grow. It consists of analytical frameworks that allow researchers to create and select plants that are consistently outstanding in desired traits. The central objective in plant breeding is to improve the genetic basis of commercial crop species to comply with changing demands on yield and quality. Statistics plays a key role in modern plant breeding. A classical quantitative genetic model writes the phenotype as an outcome of genetic, environmental and genotype by environment interaction effects. In the genomic era, this classical model has been extended and generalized. Linear mixed models played an important role in classical quantitative genetics and still do so in modern genetics. The availability of genomic tools and resources is leading to a new revolution of plant breeding, as they facilitate the study of the genotype and its relationship with the phenotype, in particular for complex traits.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;   Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics  September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA: Protein Synthesis and Translational Control September 9 – 13, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany;  Workshop on Plant Development and Drought Stress Pacific Grove November 1 - 4, 2015 CA, USA; Plant-Based Vaccines, Antibodies and Biologics June 8-10, 2015 Lausanne, Switzerland; ICBAGE 2015 :  Conference on Biodiversity and Agricultural Genetic Engineering March 9 - 10, 2015 Miami, USA;  Conference on Chromosomal Genetics and Evolution September 25 - 26, 2015 London, United Kingdom

Track 3: Plant Epigenetics

A number of epigenetic phenomena were discovered in plants, but are not limited to plants. For instance, paramutation describes the heritable change in expression status of an allele upon its exposure to an allele that has the same sequence but displays a different expression status.  plant biology has made to the discovery and study of epigenetic phenomena, plants provide ideal systems for epigenomics research. Epigenomic modifications alter gene expression without changing the letters of the DNA alphabet (A-T-C-G), providing cells with an additional tool to fine-tune how genes control the cellular machinery. By understanding epigenomic alterations in plants, scientists may be able to manipulate them for various purposes, including biofuels and creating crops that can withstand stressful events such as drought.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;   International Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics    September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA:  Plant Breeding Congress and EUCARPIA-Oil and Protein Crops Section Conference November 01-05 Antalya ,Turkey; Conference on Rye Breeding and Genetics June 24 – 26, 2015 Wrocław, Poland;  11th  Congress of Plant Molecular Biology(IPMB) October 25 - 30, 2015 Foz do Iguazu, Brazil; Plant Genomics Congress September 14-15, 2015 St. Louis, USA;  Meeting of the EUCARPIA Section Biometrics in Plant Breeding September  9-11, 2015 Wageningen, the Netherlands

Track4: Genome Sequencing 

 Plant Genomics researchers have readily embraced new algorithms, technologies and approaches to generate genome, transcriptome and epigenome datasets for model and crop species that have permitted deep inferences into plant biology. When a species’ reference genome is available, whole-genome resequencing is an efficient approach for discovering genes, SNPs, and structural variants, while simultaneously determininggenotypes. Information from these studies will fill in the gaps that exist in the genetic maps of many plant species, improving plant breeding and selection, and enabling definitive comparative genomic analyses within and across species.

Related Conference: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  International Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA:  Plant Breeding Congress and EUCARPIA-Oil and Protein Crops Section Conference  November 01-05 Antalya ,Turkey;  Conference on Rye Breeding and Genetics June 24 – 26, 2015 Wrocław, Poland;  11th  Congress of Plant Molecular Biology(IPMB) October 25 - 30, 2015 Foz do Iguazu, Brazil; Plant Genomics Congress September 14-15, 2015 St. Louis, USA;  Meeting of the EUCARPIA Section Biometrics in Plant Breeding September  9-11, 2015 Wageningen, the Netherlands

Track5: Plant Genomics Applications

Recent technological advancements have substantially expanded our ability to analyze and understand plant genomes and to reduce the gap existing between genotype and phenotype. The fast evolving field of genomicsallows scientists to analyze thousands of genes in parallel, to understand the genetic architecture of plant genomes and also to isolate the genes responsible for mutations. Model organisms provide genetic and molecular insights into the biology of more complex species. Since the genomes of most plant species are either too large or too complex to be fully analyzed, the plant scientific community has adopted model organisms. They share features such as being diploid and appropriate for genetic analysis, being amenable to genetic transformation, having a (relatively) small genome and a short growth cycle, having commonly available tools and resources, and being the focus of research by a large scientific community. Genomics will accelerate the application of gene technology to agriculture. Plant genomics research now accounts for only 2% of the U.S. federal research and development budget, despite a 35% rate of return to society.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA:  Plant Breeding Congress and EUCARPIA-Oil and Protein Crops Section Conference  November 01-05 Antalya ,Turkey;  Conference on Rye Breeding and Genetics June 24 – 26, 2015 Wrocław, Poland;  11th  Congress of Plant Molecular Biology(IPMB) October 25 - 30, 2015 Foz do Iguazu, Brazil; Plant Genomics Congress September 14-15, 2015 St. Louis, USA;  Meeting of the EUCARPIA Section Biometrics in Plant Breeding September  9-11, 2015 Wageningen, the Netherlands

Track6: Plant Tissue Culture

Plant cells can be grown in isolation from intact plants in tissue culture systems. The cells have the characteristics of callus cells, rather than other plant cell types. These are the cells that appear on cut surfaces when a plant is wounded and which gradually cover and seal the damaged area.The plant cells can grow on a solid surface as friable, pale-brown lumps (called callus), or as individual or small clusters of cells in a liquid medium called a suspension culture. These cells can be maintained indefinitely provided they are sub-cultured regularly into fresh growth medium.

Tissue culture cells generally lack the distinctive features of most plant cells. They have a small vacuole, lack chloroplasts and photosynthetic pathways and the structural or chemical features that distinguish so many cell types within the intact plant are absent. They are most similar to the undifferentiated cells found in meristematic regions which become fated to develop into each cell type as the plant grows. Tissue cultured cells can also be induced to re-differentiate into whole plants by alterations to the growth media. Plant tissue cultures can be initiated from almost any part of a plant. The physiological state of the plant does have an influence on its response to attempts to initiate tissue culture. The parent plant must be healthy and free from obvious signs of disease or decay. The source, termed explant, may be dictated by the reason for carrying out the tissue culture. Younger tissue contains a higher proportion of actively dividing cells and is more responsive to a callus initiation programme. The plants themselves must be actively growing, and not about to enter a period of dormancy.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and  Pharmacogenomics  September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA: Conference on Chromosomal Genetics and Evolution September 25 - 26, 2015 London, United Kingdom; EMBL Symposium — The mobile genome: Genetic and physiological impacts of transposable elements September 16-19, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany; The Epigenetics Discovery Congress London September  24–25, 2015 London, United Kingdom; Plant Epigenetics: From Genotype to Phenotype February,  15–19 2016 Taos, United States.

Track7: Mendilian Genetics

In the 1860’s, an Austrian monk named Gregor Mendel introduced a new theory of inheritance based on his experimental work with pea plants.  Prior to Mendel, most people believed inheritance was due to a blending of parental ‘essences’, much like how mixing blue and yellow paint will produce a green color.  Mendel instead believed that heredity is the result of discrete units of inheritance, and every single unit (or gene) was independent in its actions in an individual’s genome.  According to this Mendelian genetics concept, inheritance of a trait depends on the passing-on of these units.

Mendelian Genetics is widely regarded as the corner stone of classical genetics. It is a set of primary beliefs relating to the transmission of hereditary characteristic from parent organisms to their offspring; it underlies much of genetics. Off spring is the product of You do not have access to view this node, a new organism produced by one or more parents.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  International Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics  September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA; Conference on Arabidopsis Research June July 29-03, 2016 Gyeongju , South Korea;  EMBO Practical Course: Insights into plant biological processes through phenotyping September 13 -19,  2015 Ghent, Belgium;  GET Global Conference September 17-19, 2015 Vienna,  Austria;  The Conference on Genomics Shenzhen October 22-25, 2015 Shenzhen,  China

Track 8: Plant Genomics in World Economy

The global market for genomics is expected to reach USD 22.1 billion by 2020, growing at an estimated CAGR of 10.3% from 2014 to 2020, according to a new study by Grand View Research, Inc. Genomics play an imperative role in the field of infectious disease testing by enabling the use of fast and effective result rendering molecular diagnostic tests. This, coupled with growing prevalence of infectious diseases and hospital acquired infections is expected to drive market growth during the forecast period. Other driving factors for this market include decreasing prices of DNA sequencing, increasing demand for genome analysis in animal and plant feedstock, extensive presence of both private and public external funding programs and growing patient awareness levels. In addition, presence of untapped growth opportunities in emerging countries such as India, Brazil and China and the increasing health awareness are expected to serve this market as future growth opportunities.

Genomics based diagnostics dominated the overall market in terms of revenue at 36.4% in 2013 majorly owing to the presence of a relatively larger number of RandD programs. Genomics based personalized medicine segment on the other hand is expected to grow at the fastest CAGR of over 12.0% from 2014 to 2020 due to increasing demand for population based therapeutic solutions and subsequent increase in RandD initiatives.

Plant Genomics Market Size - $11.1 Billion in 2013, Market Growth - CAGR of 10.3% from 2014 to 2020, Market Trends - Growing demand for personalized medicine and the consequent rise in demand for genomics based RandD initiatives is expected to drive market growth during the forecast period

Related Conferences: 5th International Conference on Agriculture & Horticulture, June 27-29, 2016, Cape Town, South Africa; 7th Global Summit on Agriculture & Horticulture, October 17-19 2016, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 6th Agriculture Industry and Machinary Congress, September 26-28, 2016, Miami, USA; 2nd Global Summit on Plant Science, October 31-November 02, 2016, Baltimore, USA; ISTA Seed Symposium, June 15-17 2016, Tallinn, Estonia; Combined CropsSoilsHorticulture and Weeds Congress 2016, January 18-21 2016, Free State, Bloemfontein; 18th International Conference on Agronomy and Crop Sciences, September 15-16 2016, Rome, Italy; 7th International Crop Science Congress, August 14-19 2016, Beijing China. Crop Science Society of America;

Track9: Plant Stem Cells

Plants have emerged as powerful production platforms for the expression of fully functional recombinant mammalian proteins. These expression systems have demonstrated the ability to produce complex glycoproteins in a cost-efficient manner at large scale. The full realization of the therapeutic potential of stem cells has only recently come into the forefront of regenerative medicine. Stem cells are unprogrammed cells that can differentiate into cells with specific functions. Regenerative therapies are used to stimulate healing and might be used in the future to treat various kinds of diseases. Regenerative medicine will result in an extended healthy life span. A fresh apple is a symbol for beautiful skin. Hair greying for example could be shown to result from the fact that the melanocyte stem cells in the hair follicle have died off.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA: Conference on Chromosomal Genetics and Evolution September 25 - 26, 2015 London, United Kingdom; EMBL Symposium — The mobile genome: Genetic and physiological impacts of transposable elements September 16-19, 2015 Heidelberg, Germany; The Epigenetics Discovery Congress London September  24–25, 2015 London, United Kingdom; Plant Epigenetics: From Genotype to Phenotype February,  15–19 2016 Taos, United States

Track 10: Molecular Farming

The commonly used term ‘molecular farming’ describes the large‐scale production of valuable proteins intransgenic plants, including antibodies, vaccines, other pharmaceuticals and industrial proteins. Compared to traditionally used systems such as microbial cultures, plants offer many advantages with respect to economy, quality and safety. The organism or material into which the new genetic information is inserted is often referred to as the expression system since it serves as the system for “expressing” the new product.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA; Plant Genomes and Biotechnology: from genes to networks December 02-05, 2015 Berlin, Germany; Plant Genome Evolution 2015 September,  6 - 8 2015 Amsterdam, The Netherlands;  The Plant Genomics Congress September 14-15,2015 Missouri, USA;  ProkaGENOMICS — European Conference on Prokaryotic and Fungal Genomics 29 September-2 October 2015 Göttingen, Germany;   Meeting on Bioinformatics and OMICs October 27- 30,2015 Varadero, Cuba;  The Plant Genomics Congress: September 14-15, 2015 MO, USA;  

Track 11: Plant Physiology 

Plant Physiology and Biochemistry embraces physiology, biochemistry, molecular biologybiophysics, structure and genetics at different levels, from the molecular to the whole plant and environment. Plant physiology is a sub discipline of botany concerned with the functioning, or physiology, of plants. The field of plant physiology includes the study of all the internal activities of plants—those chemical and physical processes associated with life as they occur in plants. This includes study at many levels of scale of size and time. At the smallest scale are molecular interactions of photosynthesis and internal diffusion of water, minerals, and nutrients.

Related Conferences:  International Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA; Plant Genomes and Biotechnology: from genes to networks December 02-05, 2015 Berlin, Germany; Plant Genome Evolution 2015 September,  6 - 8 2015 Amsterdam, The Netherlands;  The Plant Genomics Congress September 14-15,2015 Missouri, USA;  ProkaGENOMICS — European Conference on Prokaryotic and Fungal Genomics 29 September-2 October 2015 Göttingen, Germany;   Meeting on Bioinformatics and OMICs October 27- 30,2015 Varadero, Cuba;  The Plant Genomics Congress: September 14-15, 2015 MO, USA;  ;

Track 12: plant pathology

Plant pathology is the scientific study of diseases in plants caused by pathogens (infectious organisms) and environmental conditions (physiological factors). Plant pathology also involves the study of pathogenidentification, disease etiology, disease cycles, economic impact, plant disease epidemiology, plant disease resistance, how plant diseases affect humans and animals, pathosystem genetics, and management of plant diseases. Plant pathology is an applied science that deals with the nature, causes and control of plant diseases in agriculture and forestry.

Related Conferences: Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;   Conference on Green Energy and Expo   September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA; National Conference on Algal Technologies January 4th, 2016 Visakhapatnam, India;  The Genomics of Common Diseases September 2-5, 2015 Cambridge, UK; 36th New Phytologist Symposium: Cell biology at the plant-microbe interface 29 November – 1 December 2015 Munich, Germany;  GPC/SEB Plant Section Symposium on Stress Resilience October 23 – 25 2015 - Iguassu Falls, Brazil ;  12th  Conference of the European Chitin Society   August 30- September 2, 2015 Münster, Germany

Track 13: Systems Biology

Although ecologists and physiologists have been using a systems approach to study plants for many years, asystems biology approach that reaches to and includes molecular details is only feasible now with the advent of genomic technologies. Thus, the exciting prospect of the post-genomic era is for the first time to be able to integrate knowledge across different levels of biological organization and to anchor this at the molecular level. The biological systems studied in the department, such as cell cycle, lateral root development, cell death, lignification, bud dormancy, leaf development, plant-microbe interactions, are all highly complex and will benefit considerably from the integration in a systems biology approach. Biologists now have the tools at hand to view the global behaviour of their preferred model systems and to better select the genes that are likely to play key roles in the regulation of entire processes.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ;  Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany;  Conference on Green Energy and Expo  September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA; Plant Genomes and Biotechnology: from genes to networks December 02-05, 2015 Berlin, Germany; Plant Genome Evolution 2015 September,  6 - 8 2015 Amsterdam, The Netherlands;  The Plant Genomics Congress September 14-15,2015 Missouri, USA;  ProkaGENOMICS — European Conference on Prokaryotic and Fungal Genomics 29 September-2 October 2015 Göttingen, Germany;   Meeting on Bioinformatics and OMICs October 27- 30,2015 Varadero, Cuba;  The Plant Genomics Congress: September 14-15, 2015 MO, USA

Track 14:  Cereals and Crops        

Comparison of the order of blocks within the different cereal chromosomes revealed that each cereal genome can be derived from the cleavage of a single structure, a hypothetical ‘ancestral’ genome, from which the genomes of present day cereals and grasses have evolved. The rice genome is one of the smallest among the cereals and grasses, and in 1995, we demonstrated that rice could be a model for cereals based on this ‘synteny’ because its genome can be divided into groups of genes - a series of genomic building blocks - from which the other larger cereal genomes can be constructed. The genome analysis will also help in our efforts for improvement of staple foods for yield and quality, which is a continuous process because neither the conditions of cultivation nor the genomes have to be targeted to the need of adaptations to a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses. Functional food components vary across the cereal crops and within different tissues of grain.

Related Conferences: International  Conference on Plant Physiology June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA ; Global Summit on Plant Science September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Conference on Agriculture and Horticulture  June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa ; Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics September 22-24, 2016 Berlin, Germany; Conference on Green Energy and Expo September 21-23, 2015 Orlando, FL, USA; Plant Genomes and Biotechnology: from genes to networks December 02-05, 2015 Berlin, Germany; Plant Genome Evolution 2015 September,  6 - 8 2015 Amsterdam, The Netherlands;  The Plant Genomics Congress September 14-15,2015 Missouri, USA;  ProkaGENOMICS — European Conference on Prokaryotic and Fungal Genomics 29 September-2 October 2015 Göttingen, Germany;   Meeting on Bioinformatics and OMICs October 27- 30,2015 Varadero, Cuba;  The Plant Genomics Congress: September 14-15, 2015 MO, USA

 

 

Importance and scope

Plant genomics is a mounting and constantly evolving field of study, one which has gained much ground in past years through the development of advanced research and data management tools. Expert researchers explore the current issues and methodologies of this expanding field, specifically addressing areas of gene discovery and the functional analysis of genes with a target on the primary tools and sub-disciplines of genetic mapping, mRNA,  protein and metabolite profiling. Plant genomics employ exciting new methods to investigate molecular plant breeding technology and gene functional analysis via transformation, mutation, protein function, and gene expression. The success of transgenic crops has erased the last vestiges of doubt about the value of agricultural biotechnology and triggered large-scale investments in plant genomics. The first genomics technology that was practiced on a large scale was sequencing the 5′ ends of cDNAs, to produce expressed sequence tags (ESTs).

Plant Genomics has roots in agriculture and Plant Genomics also has scope in agriculture fields, medicine, food production and textiles. It is the main source of food for human being. As well as we can get plant proteins, phytochemicals from plants, from medicinal plants some medicines are prepared and which can cure some fatal diseases. Form some recent study it is proved that plant antioxidant helps us to protect from free radical damage. By using Phytochemicals some cancer cell proliferation can be prevented at earlier stage. Beside that we can increase the nutrition value of plant by plant biotechnology and plant breeding.  Now days green energy are used as non-conventional source of energy to reduce environmental pollution. So in human life Plant Genomics and plant oriented studies are very much important to sustain in this planet.

Value of Plant genomics to Agriculture and Society

Genomics will accelerate the application of gene technology to agriculture. this technology will enhance food security, by increasing productivity, and food safety, by eliminating Mycotoxins. There is a third benefit, derived from the first two: increased wealth. By accelerating the application of technology, genomics significantly increases the value of seeds and agricultural products. This increase adds much wealth to the customers, company owners, employees, and citizens of the nations in which genetic supply companies operate, and to both producing and importing nations whose food costs consequently are decreased.

Agricultural plant genomics should be publicly funded for several reasons. First, the DNA sequence of plants is necessary for continued low-cost, rapid progress to understand crops. As such, it is an essential resource for scientists in both the public and private sectors. Second, industry needs the public sector to create innovative methods for structuring and analysing databases, which can’t be done without access to genomics resources. Third, genomics is an equalizer in the research world. 

Why Brisbane?

Brisbane is the capital and most populous city in the Australian state of Queensland and it is one of the third most famous cities in Australia. Brisbane's metropolitan area has a population of 2.3 million and the South East Queensland urban conurbation centred on Brisbane; encircle a population of more than 3 million. Brisbane is named after the Brisbane River on which it is located, which  was named after the Governor of New South Wales from 1821 to 1825, Scotsman Sir Thomas Brisbane.

Brisbane has seen consistent economic growth in recent years as a result of the resources bang. White-collar industries include financial services, information technology, higher education and public sector administration generally concentrated in and around the central business district and recently established office areas in the inner suburbs. Most of the universities and research institutes located nearby Brisbane in Australia offer courses on Agriculture. University of Queensland is the one of the famous college offering courses and Plant Genomics, Plant genetics, Plant breeding

Tourism plays a major role in Brisbane's economy, being the third-most popular destination for international tourists after Melbourne and Sydney. Prominent tourist and amusement areas in Brisbane include the South Bank Parklands, Roma Street Parkland, the City Botanic Gardens, Brisbane Forest Park and Portside Wharf. The Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary opened in 1927 and was the world's first koala sanctuary. The suburb of Mount Coot-tha is home to a popular state forest, and the Brisbane Botanic Gardens.

Why  to attend???

The significance of plants in human life is significant. Plants and plant products are essential for us. Food, energy, medicine and so many things we are able to get from plants. This conference seek to bring all such scientist, Noble Laureate, researcher, research scholar, students and people together who are involved in this field and provide them to discuss about their innovation, exchange ideas and interaction with each other.

Major Plant science Associations around the Globe

American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB)

Australian Society of Plant Scientists (ASPS)

Argentinean Society of Plant Physiology (SAFV)

American Society of Agronomy (ASA)

African Crop Science Society (ACSS)

Brazilian Society of Plant Physiology (SBFV)

Botanical Society of China (BSC)

Canadian Society of Plant Biologists (CSPB)

Chile’s National Network of Plant Biologists (CNNPB)

Chinese Society of Plant Biology (CSPB)

Crop Science Society of America (CSSA)

Crop Science Society of China (CSSC)

European Association for Research on Plant Breeding (EUCARPIA)

European Plant Science Organisation (EPSO)

Federation of European Societies of Plant Biology (FESPB)

Genetics Society of China (GSC)

International Society of Plant Pathology (ISPP)

Indian Society of Plant Physiology (ISPP)

International Crop Science Society (ICSS)

International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS)

Irish Plant Scientists' Association (IPSA)

International Society for Plant Molecular Biology (ISPMB)

Japanese Society for Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (JSPCMB)

Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists (JSPP)

Korean Society of Plant Biologists (KSPB)

New Zealand Society of Plant Biologists (NZSPB)

Australian Plant Society:

Grassland Society of NSW

Aerial Agricultural Association of Australia

Australian  Native Plant Society

AgForce

Agribusiness Association of Australia

AusBiotech

Australasian Plant Pathology Society

Australian Association of Agricultural Consultants (WA)

Australian Certified Organic

Australian Pest Controllers

Australian Society of Soil Science 

Target Audience:

The target audience will be Plant Biologist, Microbiologist, plant physiologist, agriculturalist plant pathologist, Molecular and cell biologist researcher or scientist who are researching in cancer biology and using plant product as cancer reducing agent.

Meet Your Target Market With members from around the world focused on learning about Plant Genomics, this is your single best opportunity to reach the largest assemblage of participants from the all Over the World. Conduct demonstrations, distribute information, meet with current, make a splash with a new product line, and receive name recognition at this 3-day event. World-renowned speakers, the most recent techniques, tactics, and the newest updates in Plant Science are hallmarks of this conference.

A Unique Opportunity for Advertisers and Sponsors at this International event:

http://plantgenomics.conferenceseries.com/sponsors.php

The global market for genomics is expected to reach USD 22.1 billion by 2020, growing at an estimated CAGR of 10.3% from 2014 to 2020, according to a new study by Grand View Research, Inc. Genomics play an imperative role in the field of infectious disease testing by enabling the use of fast and effective result rendering molecular diagnostic tests. This, coupled with growing prevalence of infectious diseases and hospital acquired infections is expected to drive market growth during the forecast period. Other driving factors for this market include decreasing prices of DNA sequencing, increasing demand for genome analysis in animal and plant feedstock, extensive presence of both private and public external funding programs and growing patient awareness levels. In addition, presence of untapped growth opportunities in emerging countries such as India, Brazil and China and the increasing health awareness are expected to serve this market as future growth opportunities.

Genomics based diagnostics dominated the overall market in terms of revenue at 36.4% in 2013 majorly owing to the presence of a relatively larger number of R&D programs. Genomics based personalized medicine segment on the other hand is expected to grow at the fastest CAGR of over 12.0% from 2014 to 2020 due to increasing demand for population based therapeutic solutions and subsequent increase in R&D initiatives.

Market Size - $11.1 Billion in 2013, Market Growth - CAGR of 10.3% from 2014 to 2020, Market Trends - Growing demand for personalized medicine and the consequent rise in demand for genomics based R&D initiatives is expected to drive market growth during the forecast period

 

http://globenewswire.com/news-release/2014/11/12/682426/10107796/en/Global-

Worldwide Institutions Statistics

Companies working on Agriculture

Colleges on Agriculture

OMICS International Conferences invites all the participants from all over the world to attend '4th International  Conference on Plant Genomics' during July 14-15, 2016 in Brisbane, Australia which includes prompt keynote presentations, Oral talks, Poster presentations and Exhibitions.

Plant Genomics 2016 is the premier event that brings together a unique and international mix of experts, researchers and decision makers both from academia and industry across the globe to exchange their knowledge, expertise and research innovations to build a world class plant genomics conference.

It’s our greatest pleasure to welcome you to the official website of 4th International Conference on Plant Genomics that aims at bringing together the Professors, Researchers, scientists, Program developers to provide an international forum for the dissemination of original research results, new ideas and practical development experiences which concentrate on both theory and practices. The conference will be held in July14-15, 2016 at Brisbane, Australia. The theme of the conference is around," Frontiers in Plant Genomics: From discovery to applications”. Featuring 2days of scientific workshop, special sessions, speaker & poster session, Industrial Expo. 300+ attendees from all over the world.

The event focuses on aspects such as breeding, molecular marker development, crop/ trait improvement, disease resistance, epigenetics, evolution studies and pathology as well understanding tools to overcome barrier and enable successful data analysis and management. Presentations concentrate not only particular to plant genomics but also crop and forestry research ranging from wheat, barley, maize and rice to potato, tomato, arabidopsis, biofuels and various fruits. OMICS International organizes a conference series of 1000+ Global Events inclusive of 300+ Conferences, 500+ Upcoming and Previous Symposiums and Workshops in USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific societies and publishes 700+ Open access journals which contains over 30000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Why to attend???

With members from around the world focused on learning about Plant Genomics and its advances; this is your best opportunity to reach the largest assemblage of participants from the Plant Science and Genomics community. Conduct presentations, distribute information, meet with current and potential scientists, make a splash with new advancements and developments, and receive name recognition at this 2-day event. World-renowned speakers, the most recent techniques, developments, and the newest updates in Plant Genomics are hallmarks of this conference.

Target Audience:

  • Plant Genomics Students, Scientists
  • Plant Genomics Researchers
  • Plant Genomics Faculty
  • Agricultural Colleges
  • Plant and Agriculture Associations and Societies
  • Business Entrepreneurs
  • Training Institutes
  • Software developing companies
  • Manufacturing Agricultural Devices Companies


 

M S Swaminathan
Genomics-2014

OMICS Group Conferences successfully hosted its premier 2nd International Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics during September 08-10, 2014 at DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel-Raleigh-Brownstone University, USA.

The conference brought together a broad spectrum of the Genomics community, educators from research universities with their programs and state colleges from across the world, as well as representatives from industry and professional geosciences societies.

This 2nd  International Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics was based on the theme “Envisioning the Genomic Advances in Global Health” which covered the below scientific sessions:

Functional genomics

  • Transcriptional profiling
  • mRNA analysis
  • Cancer Genomics
  • Analysis of Non-coding RNA
  • Digital Gene Expression and Modern Genetics
  • Evolutionary and Comparative Genomics
  • Genomics Technology and Methodology Development
  • Next Generation Sequencing Services
  • Pharmacogenomics Past, Present and Future
  • Plant and Ecological Genomics
  • Clinical Genomics

The conference was greeted by the conference moderator Junio Cota, VTT Brasil, Brazil. The support was extended by the honorable guest Krishna Dronamraju, Foundation for Genetic Research, USA; Anton A. Komar, Cleveland State University, USA; J. Claiborne Stephens, Genomics GPS, LLC USA and energized by Keynote presentations.

 This 2nd International Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics uplifted with more than 30 oral presentations by researchers, scientists, professors, industry delegates and more than 6 poster participants around the globe. OMICS Group International has taken the privilege of felicitating Earth Science-2014 Organizing Committee Members, Editorial Board Members of the supported Journals and Keynote Speakers who supported for the success of this event.

Last but not the least OMICS Group International Conferences wishes to acknowledge with its deep sincere gratitude to all the supporters from  the Editorial Board Members of our Open Access Journals, Keynote speakers, Honorable guests, Valuable speakers, Poster presenters, students, delegates and special thanks to the Exhibitors and Media partners for their support to make this event a huge success.

With enormous feedback from the participants and supporters of 2nd International Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics, OMICS Group conferences is glad to announce its 3rd International Conference on Genomics and Pharmacogenomics (Genomics-2015) event fron September 21-23, 2015 at San Antonio, USA.


Past Reports  Gallery  

Genomics-2013

The International Conference on Functional and Comparative Genomics & Pharmacogenomics (Genomics-2013) was organized by the OMICS Group during November 12-14, 2013 at DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Chicago-North Shore, IL, USA. The conference was well received with participation from Genomics-2013 Organizing Committee Members, researchers, scientists, technologists and students from various parts of the world. The three day program witnessed thought provoking speeches from experts which focused on the theme “Recent Research Methodologies and Discoveries in Genomics Era”. The theme touched upon various topics like


•    Functional and Comparative Genomics
•    Pharmacogenomics and Personalized medicine
•    Evolutionary and Developmental Genomics
•    Bioinformatics in Genomics & Proteomics
•    Cancergenomics
•    Epigenomics, Transcriptomics and Non-coding genomics
•    Genome Sequencing & Mapping
•    Plant & Ecological Genomics
•    Biomarkers & Molecular Markers

The Conference has gathered support from The European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT), The Nestle Institute of Health Sciences and Geneticational.

Genomics-2013 has swirl up the scientific thoughts on various current genome research related areas. The conference has shown scope of pharmacogenomics (studies of how variations in the human genome affect response to the drugs) and its implications in global health and pharma industry. The conference focused on how pharmacogenomics aids in diagnosing genetic information thus helping to predict not only patient’s drug response but also many other effects like adverse drug effects and their interactions and the diseases related to that gene. The conference was initiated with a series of invited lectures delivered by both Honorable Guests and members of the Keynote Forum.

Clyde A. Hutchison, Distinguished Investigator from J. Craig Venter Institute, USA who helped in determining the first complete sequence of a DNA molecule (phiX174) and developed site-directed mutagenesis with Michael Smith (1978) delivered a phenomenal and worthy keynote presentation on Building a minimal cell – The JCVI design-build-test cycle for synthetic cells during the conference.

Roger Hendrix, Distinguished Professor from University of Pittsburgh, USA explained how he and his group are involved in Genomic analysis of bacteriophages.

William C. Reinhold from National Cancer Institute, NIH, USA presented his speech on “The current state of comparative genomics and pharmacogenomics, and the application of the NCI-60 resources and CellMiner tools to these problems”.

The conference was chaired by Alexander Bolshoy, Yasuo Iwadate, Gil Atzmon, Gary A. Bulla, Jatinder Lamba, William C. Reinhold, Luciano Brocchieri and Ning-Sun Yang.

Along with the participants of Genomics-2013, we would like to express our gratitude to Dr. Alexander Bolshoy and Dr. William C. Reinhold for their extreme support and assistance towards the conference.

Students from various parts of the world took active participation in poster presentations. Mr. Aren Ewing and Mr. Chih-Yao Hsu were awarded with best posters for their outstanding contribution.

OMICS Group also took the privilege of felicitating Genomics-2013 Organizing Committee,Editorial Board Members of Journal of Data Mining in Genomics and Proteomics, Journal of Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoproteomics, Journal of Phylogenetics and Evolutionary Biology and Journal of Proteomics and Bioinformatics, Keynote Speakers,  Chair and Co-Chairs whose support led the conference into the path of excellence.

The warm support and suggestions from all the participants, inspires us in organizing “2nd International Conference on Genomics & Pharmacogenomics” which will be held duringSeptember 08-09, 2014 Raleigh, USA.

 

Past Reports  Gallery  

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Genomics 2013
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